Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
STATION
CNNW 22
CNN 16
FOXNEWS 15
MSNBCW 14
MSNBC 8
KQED (PBS) 7
CSPAN2 4
KQEH (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
FBC 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
WETA 2
WJLA (ABC) 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 140
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)
't understand that. >> it was a un thing.. >> nina is right. the totally fabricated specter of u.n. helicopters coming to home schooling parents and takiking their children away from themem. thesguys live in absolute terror of a primary challenge to eight republicans supported the equivalent of a bill supppported by y it george bush and backed by mr. republican himself, bob dole, who for 67 years has walked around with one arm 2.5 inches shorter and limb from his injuries from wod war ii. >> i don't think i've ever seen a larger ratio of enthusiasm and passion to substance in an issue in my life. these u.n. treaties are not worth the paper they're written onon. we have a u.n. treaty on chemical weapons, we have a u.n. treaty on a new, we have the un at trading on the environment. this makes no difference -- >> why not throw a bone to bob dole? >> why throw a bone to the un? >> oh. >> is run byy dictatotors, it has a human rights committee with the worst violators in the world. why should we give any legitimacy at all? give me an answer on that. >> the chamber of commerce supports the street, al
have a u.n. treaty on chemical weapons, we have a u.n. treaty on nukes, we have a u.n. treaty on everything. this makes no difference. >> why cannot throw a bone to bob dole? >> why to throw a bone to the u.n. -- >> oh. >> is run by dictators, it has a human rights committee on which the worst violators in the world -- why should we subsidize it and give it any of the legitimacy at all? give me an answer on that. >> the chamber of commerce supports the street, along with veterans' organizations and religious groups. they support it because the united states has been the leader in this area and they but like other countries to comply -- >> it is model on the americans with disabilities act. >> i know, but it has no effect. >> the point of the treaty is to get other countries to become signatories to adopt the language and the intent of the treaty, which is to look out for people with disabilities -- >> the way -- >> you accept the argument. >> oh, yeah, the way they human rights commission has spread human rights to countries around the world. >> we used to call people who thin
is a country that was experiencing a crisis of huge proportions. according to the u.n., many destroyed in syria. many homes in syria are just gone. there are activists that i work with the talk about these elements in northern syria. [inaudible] throughout the country, gives us the access to compromise. syrians are coming together, trying to fill the vacuum or gap rather than being created by a contracting element. i thought that was very interesting because syrians don't have experience. governments govern themselves, they have govern themselves and the 1960s to be highly centralized. the state is maintaining control of everything in syria, in that aspect, -- we want to find out more about this narrative in syria. it was hosted in aleppo. aleppo was the perfect choice because it is arguably the most populated city in syria, it is in northern syria. there is a local part of the city, the countryside as well. the countryside and the city make up the government -- [inaudible] of syria. all of the perl -- the 70% of the cities have been stripped away. the first enacted in the cities is i was hoste
that has tossed a country into chaos. team fox coverage continues now. jonathan hunt at the u.n. jonathan, this looks like the beginning of an end game to many. >> yeah. it certainly does. the rebels have clearly taken the decision within the past week that they cannot bring about the downfall of the assad regime without taking the battle directly to the capital damascus. they do not, however, yet have the fire power to win in one big final assault. so this is likely to be a war of attrition within damascus itself and president assad has gathered his hot best trained troops around his strong holds within the capital so this may well go on for days. butng to a lot of experts, the pressure on president assad is growing day by day. and that is why there is the concern about the use of these chemical weapons because they say in many ways now, president assad is like a cornered rat. shep? >> shepard: jonathan, still so many questions about what happens after assad. >> yeah, and that's one of the problems here for the international community. we have heard again and again just how many factions
into it. it's a long story, but stay with us. on tuesday the senate rejected a u.n. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. 125 other countries ratified this, but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving the treaty five votes short of ratification. what we learned today that's interesting is some of these same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support very publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip-flopper and kay bailey hutchinson of texas and senator jerry moran of kansas. we asked them all to come on the program and they declined. they're silent on this. senator moran was a co-sponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty. he even put a press release back in may proclaiming his support. here he is with bob dole in june. dole, a war veteran, former republican senate leader is a long-time supporter of disability rights and a strong advocate of this treaty. just before tuesday's vote he came to the senate chamber 89 years old frail in his wheelchair. he thought it was tha
with the -- with what happened in congress yesterday, the lack of support in the united states senate for the u.n. but the u.n. process really has to go forward and has to be the leader on syria. >> i just don't think it's helpful to americans when so many senior politicians trash the u.n. you know? it's the united nations. and actually, it's better for america. >> absolutely. >> the united nations takes a lot of the work on the ground in these places. >> you're absolutely right. but there's human rights abuses that are exploding all over the world. and one that we're working very hard on right now is in uganda. there's anti-homosexuality bill that would make homosexual acts punishment by the death penalty. >> completely outrageous. >> it is. and the speaker of the house there said she's going to deliver this bill as a christmas present. so, we have 2 1/2 weeks to stop that bill right now. >> imagine. it's disgusting, isn't it? >> it certainly is. as people across this state, we're in new york state. you don't need a passport to work on human rights. right here, we're working on the farm workers
the u.s. passed 22 years ago. but 38 u. rep u.n. treaty leaving it five votes short of ratification. not even a rare visit by former republican senator bob dole who just before the vote made a difference. he's 89, appeared frail this his wheelchair and disabled from war injuries, came to the chamber to show support for this treaty. rick santorum led the charge against the treaty. he and some other republicans warned it would jeopardize u.s. sovereignty and personal freedoms. listen. >> the problem is, there's a provision in this international law which we would be adopting if the senate ratifies this that puts the state, the state in the position of determining what i in the best interest of a disabled child. >> i simply cannot support a tr that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constant looming threat of state interference. >> the treaty could be used to interfere with the ability of parents with disabled children to decide what action is in the best interest of their children. >> that all sounds very alarming. keeping them honest, it's not true. the t
with her counterpart, russian minister lab rov and a u.n. special envoy on the side of an international security conference she is taking part in. russia is one of syria's main allies but have opposed and opposed any u.n. measures against him up until this point. if clinton can submit russian support the u.n. security council might be able to pass a sanctions resolution against the syrian government particularly because of the chemical weapons issue. on wednesday in brussels clinton also renewed support for the syrian opposition. is there an exit strategy for assad? though the u.n. secretary of general said yesterday the world should not let him seek asylum senator kerry told andrea mitchell he disagrees. >> it's in our security interests to be able to get a transition that is controlled and that is negotiated and that is orderly because the alternative to that is you could have 200,000, 500,000 people killed. >> if syria crosses the red line in chemical weapons what will the u.s. do? middle east expert jeffrey goldberg joins us on the escalating violence across the region in a scoop th
santorum led the charge against the u.n. treaty and brought his 4-year-old disabled daughter bella to the events and warned it threatened american sovereignty and allow the u.n. to make decisions about disabled children in america. that is not true. here's what senator john kerry said last night. >> well, i have great respect for both rick and his wife karen and their daughter and their family. he's a strong family man. but he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it or he was just not factual in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything other this treaty. nothing. >> well, as we told you last night former republican, repeat, republican attorney general testified before the senate foreign relations committee in july basically saying exactly that. there's no nothing in the treaty that interferes with u.s. laws. that didn't stop senator santorum to send out this e-mail. you did it. you
or whether he can be persuaded to say asylum but that has the u.n. secretary-general having misgivings giving a man who has murdered 40,000 of his own people to give him retirement in a safe and friendly country. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity after gross violation of human rights. he must be held accountable and brought to justice>>jonathan: tf the argument is that any kind of solution that would persuade assad to stand down and end the slaughter of all of those syrian civilians might, actually, be worth considering. >>trace: what do we know of the reports that rebels are trying to get their act together in terms of leadership? >>jonathan: they trying to bring about some political unity. that is far easier said that done because there are so many different and disparate groups including al qaeda fighter whose have swarmed into syria and now you part of the fighting and part of the battle to oust president assad. so, it is not very easy. the next stage of trying to bring about some sort of political unity will unfold in morocco next week, the next meeting of the "friends of
. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water foroth washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will likely recover having made it in time
? talk to me about this fear of the u.n. angered the u.n., some appropriate, some not, the black helicopter deal? >> there's a lot of fear that the u.n. is somehow going to encroach on united states sovereignty and prerogatives. one of the things i thought was most sad about yesterday, was here's a veteran of world war ii, grievously wounded in the war, who spent a lifetime proving to americans that injuries didn't need to stop you from living a completely fulfilled and productive life, who had to fight like crazy to come back from those wounds, and he's on the floor, this man who defended american sovereignty, and yet people were there suggesting somehow he was there less than to defend america's sovereignty with this vote. to me that was such an amazing slap in the face and a contradiction. i think it's important not to go backwards. one of the lessons you learn here in the united states senate you live to vote another day. this treaty is not dead forever. it just stopped yesterday. we're going to bring this treaty back. we're going to bring it back next winter when we get back
. then this is the first time that foreign minister met with hillary clinton on assad, met with the u.n. mediator and we're being cautioned this is no break through but there will be follow-up meeting. seems some u.s. officials russia is hedging its bets or beginning to see a future without assad. >> i think that's the case. we've talked about this before, but there is a russian card to be played, to be played by russia itself. they have influence with president assad, they have interests in syria, and i think that they can see the handwriting on the wall that assad is eventually going to go, whether it's in the near term, long term, eventually he's going. you can see the shift in momentum as far as the rebels now starting to gain much greater military success than they have in the past. they've been weapons that have been able to take some helicopters out of the air, shoulder-fired missiles, et cetera. i think they can see the shift taking place and want to be in a position to help negotiate some sort of an acceptable ending to this where they can play the role of a peacemaker. so i think not with stan
status as a state, nonmember observer state saturdtatus in t u.n., netanyahu said, you'll go ahead for plans, just plans at this point, for a settlement on the west bank called e-1. we'll put up a map and show it. the map of the project which the obama administration says would drive a wedge into the heart of the palestinian west bank, possibly cut off east jerusalem from the rest of the west bank and my question is, will israel develop that little chunk, e-1, or are you using that as a bargaining chip, to say to the palestinians, look, you made trouble for us in the u.n. and international bodies, and, this is what we may do. if you don't, maybe we won't. >> the map is a little misleading. the yellow chunk there is actually a suburb, and, 40,000 israelis live there. it is about -- less than two miles stretch of barren desert road from the suburb to jerusalem. e-1 is the road. and we have to worry about a situation in the future where the suburb could be cut off from jerusalem. you see on the map it doesn't cut off the west bank, you can get from ramala in the north, bethlehem in th
that the north is testing a ballistic missile technology and violating u.n. resolutions and further destablizing the korean peninsula. so many hot spots in the world today to watch as we welcome you on this friday morning to a brand new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer welcome to you at home. good morning to you, again, martha. we're watching the second launch attempt since kim jong-un took over after his father's death a year ago. the last try failed. here is the head of the u.s. pacific command keeping a watch on this. >> we're approaching once again a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution and we encourage and the leadership in north korea to consider what they're doing here and the implications on the overall security environment own the careen peninsula as well as in asia. martha: molly henneberg is live. north koreans may have run into a snag with this launch plan which may be biding some time. what can you tell us about it? >> reporter: martha, a weather snag. snow may have slowed north korea's efforts to put the missile together
, mohamed el- baradei. one of morsi's highest profile opponents and former head of the u.n.'s nuclear regulatory agency. >> we will continue to push until we get a proper develop a institution. >> what is the key question? >> i think the key question is, is morsi's presidency in nature. and you have strong forces against him. everyone is united against him. >> behind him is the muslim brotherhood. and lately there is an indication apparently the armed forces protected him at the palace. if you get the muslim brotherhood and the armed forces behind him, he stays in power. >> there are now morsi's people. so the army is going to support him because he has put in all of his people to run the army. >> ryan? >> not all of his people and the armed forces are still somewhat aligned with the judiciary which is also packed with mubarek era people. morsi has taken them on. but seeing the reformers in the street is almost a hopeful sign. in a sense that they are assured -- having watched what happened to mubarek, i think morsi has got to be concerned. he has got to find some way to let a little
in the u.n. and international bodies, this is what we may do. if you don't, maybe we won't. >> the map is misleading. you saw the yellow chunk. that's a suburb where 40,000 israelis live. it's less than two miles of baron desert road from that suburb to jerusalem. that's e1, the road. and we have to worry about a situation in the future where the suburb could be cut off from jerusalem. it doesn't cut off the west bank. you can get from ramallah to bethlehem in the south by going around e-1. if there's true peace between us and the palestinians the problem is solved by a cloverleaf or tunnel underneath the road that links them to jerusalem but it was a way the israel government set down a marker. the palestinians violated agreements with us and united states by going to the u.n. all agreements state there's no tuttle active to -- alternative to direct talks. we're ready to have them today. if not we have to take measures that enable us to defend ourselves and citizens in the future. >> i just want to button up the issue of e-1, which you put your spin on it, the u.s. talks about it driv
to be a clear and credible response. what should that be? >> well, we have a very strong resolution before the u.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hu
? >> reporter: norah, it's a sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. u.n. envoy to syria is flying here to dublin for this last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. russia one of syria's few remaining allies and so far have agreed to any interactions to stop the killing of thousands of people. >> charlie rose here. the reporting that they're mixing the ingredients for chemical weapons influence what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: the russian foreign minister says that the outside russian government -- syrian government assures them that they are rumors. russia wants to be part of what comes next. if clinton can get russia to support at the u.n. security council, they could have sanctions that would cut seary off from any outside support. >> where does the violence stand? >> reporter: charlie we're told that rebels surround the city of damascus which has been an as assad stronghold.
kerry is firing back at senator rick santorum. it's all about this. opposition to a u.n. treaty. one that a lot of people thought was a no-brainer. it was about the rights of the disabled all over the world. we brought you this story yesterday. senate republicans rejecting this treaty on tuesday despite the fact that one of their own, bob dole, bob dole, a former majority leader, came to the floor in a wheelchair trying to draw support for this treaty. he was being pushed by his wife and made an impassioned plea. senator santorum explained opposition to this treaty in a piece published in "the daily beast." in part he says this. our nation has been been the worldwide leader when it comes to protecting the disabled. we should be telling the u.n. and not the other way around how to ensure dignity and respect for the disabled. effectively saying nobody tells the united states what to do. it sets a very dangerous precedent perhaps for other things. okay. that sounded legitimate until it came out that that's not what the treaty suggests. senator kerry was mincing absolutely no words in sa
the first action then that -- will we see emergency action at the u.n. perhaps this weekend? when is all this coming to a head? >> i think the russians keep moving in the direction they are, i do think they're there, sending all the signals that they are done with assad and so the market signals are there. i think you'll begin to see movement in the u.n. and, more importantly what's not being discussed the real contest about syria also involved iran. iran is the big proxy supporter of syria and, you know, we have this leak in "the new york times" or coverage in "the new york times" about a potential eventual bilateral discussion between the united states and iran. i think that solving syria, moving syria into a different place changes the game for all the other great powers with iran. >> i would love -- i'm out of time. i would love to get going with morsi. david sanger with egypt and morsi, is this going to be a situation, does he back off of this a little bit because there's such an uprising? >> yeah, you'd think so but so far his public signals have been doubling down on passing the c
and others leaders around the world issued a statement, a video statement, on behalf of malala today on u.n. human rights day. >> today we stand together with malala and the millions of other girls and women who literally risk their lives to get an education. getting an education is important to the future of every girl. it's also important for awful us collectively because when men and women have the same opportunities for education, societies are better off, economies flourish. >> this, of course, has been one of hillary clinton's issues for decades, but malala really symbolizes the struggle and how dangerous it is for girls and women in pakistan and other parts of the world still advocating for basic human rights. >> that's absolutely true. of course, the whole day was organized in her name, but really it was an effort that was intended to get the international community to mobilize behind some of these global education targets. really trying to get them to say we will meet these in the next three years, and also we're going to commit the money to be able to do so. one of those targets i
of damascus increasing fears the syrian government may start using chemical weapons. meanwhile, u.n. secretary- general ban ki-moon has hinted he would not favor an asylum deal for assad even as a way to end syria's civil war. >>> silicon valley pioneer john mcafee is now in guatemala seeking asylum after spending weeks in hiding. mcafee, who founded the santa clara software security company, is wanted for the murder of a neighbor in belize. he says he is innocent. mcafee spoke to the "associated press" in a restaurant in guatemala city after sneaking out of nearby belize. >>> 4748 now. new york police say a suspect is in custody and has implicated himself in the death of a man who was pushed on a subway track. ki-suck han died after being hit by a train at times square. han is shown in a confrontation with a suspect in a surveillance video shortly before being shoved on the track. witnesses say han desperately tried to climb back up on the platform but couldn't make it before the train struck him. >> just standing in shock not knowing what's going on. some people started running out of the pl
accountable. >> i can't wait to see what that is going to be. given the propensity the u.n. can get it fixed if he does use chemical weapons we will send him a letter. if that doesn't work a strongly worded letter and if that doesn't work, we will send him a really strongly worded letter with all of the words in bold type. you know the tragedy is the president promised us he understood people in these muslim countries and they would listen to him in a way they didn't listen to previous presidents. how is that working out for us? it is not working out at all. egypt is a mess, syria is in civil war between 40 and 50,000 people killed by its own government. problems in tunisia. problems still remaining in afghanistan and that corrupt government. i am still waiting to find out what it is that we are going to do that scares iran enough to shut down the nuclear program. in the meantime are we putting any real muscle on these crazy mad men? no demanding israel to stop bed rins. i think somehow we are missing something. i think we put more pressure on crazy governments building nuclear devices and r
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)